T-5, r. 11 - Regulation respecting the standards for diploma or training equivalence for the issue of a permit by the Ordre des technologues en imagerie médicale, en radio-oncologie et en électrophysiologie médicale du Québec

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3. A candidate holding a diploma issued by an educational institution outside Québec shall be granted a diploma equivalence for the purposes of the issue of a medical imaging technologist’s permit in the field of radiodiagnosis, a medical imaging technologist’s permit in the field of nuclear medicine or a radiation oncology technologist’s permit if the diploma was issued upon completion of studies of a level equivalent to the college level comprising a minimum of training hours apportioned as follows:
(1)  2,805 hours of training including 2,125 hours of specific training in radiodiagnostic technology apportioned as follows:
(a)  100 hours of anatomy and physiology applied to radiodiagnostics;
(b)  115 hours of physics applied to radiodiagnostics;
(c)  115 hours on radiodiagnostic apparatus;
(d)  50 hours in pharmacology and medication administration methods;
(e)  60 hours of care and health and safety in radiodiagnostics;
(f)  55 hours of assistance relations and communication in radiodiagnostics;
(g)  80 hours of image production in radiodiagnostics;
(h)  75 hours of radioprotection;
(i)  275 hours of examination methods in general radiology, tomodensitometry and ultra-sonography;
(j)  50 hours of examination methods in radiology and magnetic resonance imagery;
(k)  920 hours of clinical practice in general radiodiagnostics;
(l)  115 hours of clinical practice in ultra-sonography; and
(m)  115 hours of clinical practice in tomodensitometry;
(2)  2,925 hours of training including 2,260 hours of specific training in nuclear medicine technology apportioned as follows:
(a)  60 hours of chemistry applied to nuclear medicine;
(b)  45 hours of measuring and image production in nuclear medicine;
(c)  75 hours of electronics applied to nuclear medicine;
(d)  60 hours on the effects of radiation on matter and living beings;
(e)  105 hours on mathematical problems in nuclear medicine;
(f)  60 hours in biochemistry applied to nuclear medicine;
(g)  45 hours of care methods in nuclear medicine;
(h)  75 hours in radiopharmacology;
(i)  60 hours of health and safety and radioprotection in nuclear medicine;
(j)  90 hours of anatomy and physiology applied to nuclear medicine;
(k)  175 hours on apparatus in nuclear medicine;
(l)  60 hours of assistance relations and communication in nuclear medicine;
(m)  75 hours in data input in nuclear medicine;
(n)  75 hours of quality control in nuclear medicine;
(o)  75 hours on the components of urinary and central nervous systems;
(p)  60 hours on the components of the heart and circulatory system;
(q)  105 hours on the components of the osteo-articulatory and endocrinian systems;
(r)  90 hours on the components of the digestive and respiratory systems and other systems; and
(s)  870 of clinical practice; or
(3)  2,595 hours of training including 1,915 hours of specific training in radiation oncology technology apportioned as follows:
(a)  100 hours of anatomy and physiology applied to radiation oncology;
(b)  125 hours of physics applied to radiation oncology;
(c)  60 hours of health and safety and radioprotection;
(d)  75 hours on apparatus and teleradiotherapy;
(e)  95 hours of dosimetry;
(f)  60 hours of radiation oncology;
(g)  160 hours of care methods in external radiotherapy;
(h)  45 hours on the making of accessories in radiation oncology;
(i)  40 hours in brachytherapy;
(j)  95 hours of simulation methods;
(k)  60 hours of assistance relations and communication in radiation oncology;
(l)  700 hours of clinical practice in external radiotherapy;
(m)  150 hours of clinical practice in simulation; and
(n)  150 hours of clinical practice in dosimetry.
O.C. 523-2005, s. 3; S.Q. 2012, c. 10, s. 16.
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