B-1.1, r. 2 - Construction Code

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8.130. If a petroleum equipment installation is altered to replace an underground tank, steel piping that is not protected against corrosion and connected to the tank must be removed from the ground, unless it is subjected to a leak detection test that meets the requirements of the second paragraph indicating that it is liquid-tight and protected against corrosion in compliance with NACE SP0169 Control of External Corrosion on Underground or Submerged Metallic Piping Systems or NACE SP0285, Corrosion Control of Underground Storage Tank Systems by Cathodic Protection, published by NACE International.
The leak detection test must be conducted using a hydrostatic or vacuum method capable of detecting leaks of 1.2 L/h with a 95% probable success rate and a margin of error of no more than 5%, or using any other method capable of detecting leaks of 0.76 L/h, with the same probabilities, with the exception of pneumatic tests using gas, in the case of tanks except observation well surveillance systems. The methods must in addition meet the requirements of one of the following standards: EPA 530/UST-90/004 Standard Test Procedures for Evaluating Leak Detection Methods: Volumetric Tank Tightness Testing Methods, EPA 530/UST-90/007 Standard Test Procedures for Evaluating Leak Detection Methods: Statistical Inventory Reconciliation Methods, published by the Environmental Protection Agency.
O.C. 220-2007, s. 1; 87-2018O.C. 87-2018, s. 49.
8.130. If a petroleum equipment installation is altered to replace an underground tank, steel piping that is not protected against corrosion and connected to the tank must be removed from the ground, unless it is subjected to a leak detection test that meets the requirements of the second paragraph indicating that it is liquid-tight and protected against corrosion in compliance with RP0169-2002 Control of External Corrosion on Underground or Submerged Metallic Piping Systems or RP0285-2002 Corrosion Control of Underground Storage Tank System by Cathodic Protection, published by NACE International.
The leak detection test must be conducted using a hydrostatic or vacuum method capable of detecting leaks of 1.2 L/h with a 95% probable success rate and a margin of error of no more than 5%, or using any other method capable of detecting leaks of 0.76 L/h, with the same probabilities, with the exception of pneumatic tests using gas, in the case of tanks except observation well surveillance systems. The methods must in addition meet the requirements of one of the following standards: EPA 530/UST-90/004 Standard Test Procedures for Evaluating Leak Detection Methods: Volumetric Tank Tightness Testing Methods, EPA 530/UST-90/007 Standard Test Procedures for Evaluating Leak Detection Methods: Statistical Inventory Reconciliation Methods, published by the Environmental Protection Agency.
O.C. 220-2007, s. 1.