S-3.3, r. 2 - Regulation respecting rail safety

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Full text
chapter S-3.3, r. 2
Regulation respecting rail safety
SAFETY IN GUIDED LAND TRANSPORT - RAIL SAFETY
Act to ensure safety in guided land transport
(chapter S-3.3, ss. 50, 51 and 54).
S-3.3
September 1 2012
CHAPTER I
RAIL SAFETY CODE
DIVISION I
SCOPE AND INTERPRETATION
1. The provisions of this Chapter apply to any rail transport system operated on an industrial site, as well as on branch lines linking that site to the nearest railway line.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 1.
2. Unless the context indicates otherwise, the provisions of this Chapter respecting locomotives also apply to any other motive power.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 2.
DIVISION II
SAFETY STANDARDS
3. A locomotive engineer may not run a locomotive at a speed higher than the restricted speed and under no circumstances at a speed higher than 16 km/h (10 mph).
The restricted speed is a speed that will permit a locomotive to stop within one-half of the sighting distance of equipment or of a switch not properly lined.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 3.
4. Any employee of the rail transport system operator must communicate by the quickest available means of communication to the operator any condition that may affect rail safety.
In case of an emergency, he must have the train movement stopped by any signal at his disposal.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 4.
5. A locomotive engineer is responsible for the movement of the equipment.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 5.
6. Nobody may
(1)  stand in front of moving equipment;
(2)  ride on the side or on the roof of moving equipment when passing side and/or overhead clearance restrictions
(3)  stand on the end ladder of a moving car, except for the purpose of operating a hand brake;
(4)  get on or off equipment except by using a ladder with steps and handholds.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 6.
DIVISION III
JOBS ESSENTIAL FOR RAIL SAFETY
7. The following jobs are essential for rail safety:
(1)  the rail operating foreman;
(2)  the track maintenance foreman;
(3)  the locomotive engineer;
(4)  the brakeman; and
(5)  the signalman.
The locomotive crew consists of an engineer and at least one brakeman. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the engineer alone may use a portable locomotive control device without being part of a crew.
Only a locomotive engineer may use a portable locomotive control device.
A person may hold more than one job essential for rail safety.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 7.
8. To perform the duties of a job essential for rail safety, a person must hold a certificate of qualification issued by the operator.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 8.
9. A person who wishes to perform the duties of a job essential for rail safety must fulfil the following conditions of admission:
(1)  he must take an academic training period provided by the operator that shall allow him to learn the rail safety rules related to the exercise of his duties and those provided for in this Regulation;
(2)  he must take an apprenticeship period provided by the operator that shall allow him to master the job’s requirements;
(3)  he must learn where derails, switches and their locking devices are located;
(4)  he must pass an examination on the knowledge he has acquired during the training and the apprenticeship period.
The operator must give the person or record in the file, after he has passed the examination, the certificate of qualification referred to in section 8 bearing, besides the name of the employee, the jobs recognized by the certificate of qualification, the date of the examination and the expiry date of the certificate.
The operator may not appoint a person in a job essential for rail safety if the person is not qualified, except in the case of an apprentice under the immediate supervision of a holder of the required certificate. He is also forbidden to keep a person in a job essential for rail safety if the last examination the person has passed dates back more than 5 years.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 9.
10. The operator must prepare a rail operating handbook that shall contain the following documents:
(1)  this Regulation;
(2)  the particular rail operating rules of the enterprise, if applicable;
(3)  a description of the track indicating the location of derails, switches, compulsory stops, loading and unloading sites;
(4)  the safety rules approved by the Minister under section 55 of the Act to ensure safety in guided land transport (chapter S-3.3) that govern the movement within limits where interlocking signals are working, if applicable;
(5)  the safety instructions prescribed by the manufacturer of the portable locomotive control device, if applicable.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 10.
11. The operator must give each person who holds a job essential for rail safety an up-to-date copy of the rail operating handbook.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 11.
12. A locomotive engineer must carry the up-to-date rail operating handbook in the performance of his duties.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 12.
13. No person may perform the duties of a job essential for rail safety if he is under the influence of alcohol, cannabis or any other drug.
The operator may not knowingly allow a person who is under the influence of alcohol, cannabis or any other drug to perform duties that are essential for rail safety.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 13; 764-2019O.C. 764-2019, s. 4.
DIVISION IV
COMMUNICATION SYSTEM
14. At the beginning of their shift, the members of the locomotive crew, when equipped with radios, must carry out an intra-crew test of such radios.
When not in use, radios must be set to the standby channel and at a volume that ensures continuous monitoring.
The requirements provided for in this section do not apply when only one portable locomotive control device is used.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 14.
15. When the radio is used to control a switching, the direction of movement and the distance to travel must be indicated in each message.
If no further message is received when the movement has travelled one-half the distance to travel, the locomotive engineer must stop the movement at once.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 15.
16. A brakeman and a signalman may not use hand signals and radio simultaneously.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 16.
17. Hand signals must be given in accordance with the standards described in Schedule I.
A lantern must be used from sunset to sunrise and when day signals cannot be plainly seen.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 17.
18. A hand signal must be given by a signalman from a point where it can be plainly seen by the recipient and in sufficient time before the required action to permit compliance.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 18.
19. A signal to move forward or backward must be directly given to a locomotive engineer in relation to the front of the leading locomotive.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 19.
20. A locomotive engineer must regard the following as stop signals:
(1)  a hand signal or a radio signal when the meaning of the signal or its recipient are not clearly defined;
(2)  the signalman or the signal disappears from his view.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 20.
21. A locomotive engineer must ring the locomotive bell at least 20 seconds before it comes to a level crossing and until the locomotive or the equipment is fully engaged on the level crossing.
Under no circumstances may an engineer cross a level crossing using a locomotive that does not have an operational bell.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 21.
22. The use of the locomotive whistle or horn by an engineer is authorized only for the purposes of rail communication.
Locomotive whistles or horn signals must be given by an engineer in accordance with the standards described in Schedule II.
Under no circumstances may an engineer use a locomotive that does not have an operational whistle or horn.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 22.
23. Unless he uses a portable locomotive control device, an engineer may not move the locomotive before he has received the signal or the instructions from a member of his crew. Before the locomotive moves forward or backward, he must ring the locomotive bell or, failing that, blow the whistle or horn.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 23.
24. When equipment is pushed, a locomotive crew member or a signalman must be on the leading car or near it. That person must observe the track and, if necessary, give the locomotive engineer signals and instructions to control the train movement.
If the engineer uses a portable locomotive control device, he may himself be on the leading car or near it.
Alongside a public highway not protected by a fence or a gate, the person on the leading car or near it must warn users who cross the track or are going to cross it that equipment is arriving.
The requirement provided for in the first paragraph does not apply when equipment is brought into a building intended for unloading scrap metal.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 24.
DIVISION V
LIGHTS AND SIGNAL SYSTEM
25. A locomotive must be equipped with a white headlight at the front.
The headlight must be on at full power when the locomotive is in movement except when it moves near a public highway, in which case it must be dimmed.
Notwithstanding the second paragraph, the locomotive headlight must be on at full power when the locomotive approaches a level crossing until the equipment is fully engaged on the level crossing.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 25.
26. A locomotive that has no white headlight at the back must be equipped with a back-up light.
The locomotive engineer must turn on that headlight when the locomotive moves backward.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 26.
27. When the front white headlight of a locomotive has failed and the locomotive is equipped with ditch lights, the engineer must turn on those lights.
He must turn off the ditch lights while switching except when used in lieu of the white headlight.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 27.
28. To indicate their presence, a member of each class of employees working on or aboard equipment secured on a track must place, at the ends of that equipment, a blue flag by day, coupled with a blue light at night when the flag is not visible.
Equipment may not be placed on the same track and block a clear view of the signal installed in accordance with the first paragraph, unless the locomotive placing such equipment remains on that track until the signal is relocated to include that equipment with the one to which the signal already applies.
The requirement provided for in the first paragraph does not apply when equipment is placed on a track whose access is prohibited in accordance with subparagraph 1 of the first paragraph of section 56.
The signal provided for in the first paragraph must be set up on staffs at a height that ensures a clear view thereof from the equipment.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 28.
29. Only a member of the same class of employees that has displayed the signal is authorized to remove or move it.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 29.
30. Before urgent repair work is to be done on a locomotive or on the equipment coupled to a locomotive and if the signal provided for in the first paragraph of section 28 is not displayed, the locomotive engineer must be notified by a member of each crew.
The engineer must keep the locomotive at a stop until he has made sure that all the employees have left.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 30.
31. A locomotive engineer may not pass the signal referred to in section 28. He is also forbidden to pass a fixed signal or a sign without knowing its meaning.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 31.
32. Interlocking signal indications govern the use of the routes and authorize the movement of equipment within a limit, the interlocking limit, which is delimited by opposed interlocking signals located at the ends of the limit.
A locomotive engineer may not enter interlocking limits without having in his possession the safety rules governing the movement within those limits; he must abide by those rules.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 32.
DIVISION VI
SWITCHES AND DERAILS
33. A switch must be secured with a lock or a hook after operating its switch points. The lock or the hook must be installed so that the switch may not be operated while the lock or the hook is still in place.
If the switch is equipped with a target, the target must be green when it is set for the normal route and yellow when set for the other route.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 33.
34. A person who operates a switch must keep clear of the switch handle while it is being lifted or released.
When a switch has been manually turned, the points must be examined to verify that the switch is properly set.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 34.
35. An employee who notices that a switch is damaged must inform the operator thereof so that the latter may prohibit its access until it is repaired.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 35.
36. No trailing movement may be reversed.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 36.
37. When there is ice or snow, the engineer of a locomotive that is going to pass through a trailing switch must stop so that a locomotive crew member or the user of the portable locomotive control device can examine the switch points and remove ice or snow thereof, where applicable.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 37.
38. A locomotive crew member or the user of the portable locomotive control device must keep the derails in the derailing position at places where equipment that has been left standing on the track could move and cause an accident.
Each derail must be visible and set to derail equipment on the safest side.
Derail fastening devices must keep derails operative at all times. Derails must be locked when they are located at a public place without surveillance.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 38.
DIVISION VII
BRAKE MECHANISMS
39. A locomotive engineer may not leave equipment on a track if an insufficient number of hand brakes were applied by a brakeman to secure it or, failing that, if it was not secured with brake shoes.
Before coupling equipment to a locomotive, an engineer must make sure that the equipment is secured in accordance with the first paragraph.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 39.
40. A locomotive engineer must verify that everyone aboard or near the equipment has been notified before coupling it to the locomotive and moving it.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 40.
41. Before making a running switch, a locomotive engineer must foresee its course and verify that the switch and hand brakes are in working order.
A running switch must not be made with equipment that is occupied by people or with equipment placarded to indicate the presence of dangerous substances in accordance with section 96. Such a switch must not be made on a spring switch.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 41; O.C. 909-2003, s. 1.
42. A locomotive engineer must test the locomotive brakes before using the locomotive when it has been laid over for more than 8 hours or when it has been altered or repaired.
The test consists in verifying the application and release of the locomotive brakes.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 42.
43. A locomotive engineer must test the locomotive brakes and the equipment brakes before leaving the industrial site.
The test consists in verifying the application and release of the locomotive brakes and, where applicable, of the brakes of the train’s last car and of a sufficient number of equipment brakes to stop the movement.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 43.
44. A locomotive engineer may not leave the industrial site if the train’s last car has no operational brakes or if the equipment does not have a sufficient number of brakes to stop the movement, except if all of the following conditions are combined:
(1)  the equipment carries no dangerous substances;
(2)  the branch line has no level crossing; and
(3)  a sufficient number of derails are installed on the branch line to stop any equipment that would uncouple from the train and cause an accident.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 44.
45. Under no circumstances may an engineer use a locomotive that does not have operational brakes.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 45.
46. The locomotive brakes must be maintained by the operator in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 46.
47. The test with the portable locomotive control device must verify
(1)  that the locomotive brakes apply and release;
(2)  that the emergency function is in working order; and
(3)  that, should the user of the portable locomotive control device lose control over it, the brakes will apply and cut off the transmission of power to the locomotive traction motors.
The user of the portable locomotive control device must comply with the manufacturer’s instructions.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 47.
48. The brake test referred to in section 43 must be recorded in a register that must be kept on the site by the operator for at least 1 year from the date of each test.
The register must indicate the date on which the test was performed, the condition of the brakes of the locomotive and those of the train’s last car, the percentage of operational brakes and the engineer’s name.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 48.
DIVISION VIII
CAR AND EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE
49. The operator must submit each car that moves only on his site or on the track leading to his site to a yearly safety check carried out by a person who has the knowledge, training and experience necessary to detect defects in car equipment referred to in sections 50 to 54.
That person must fill out a check record for each car that has been checked, indicating the nature of the anomalies detected, the corrective measures taken, the date of the check, and sign it. The operator must keep the check record on the site for at least 2 years from the date of the check.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 49.
50. Before authorizing a car to be loaded, the rail operating supervisor must have it visually checked for the purposes of detecting one of the following anomalies:
(1)  a component lies about under the car body or juts out on one side of the car body;
(2)  a door or a coupler is not properly fixed; or
(3)  a wheel is broken or very cracked.
Where one of those anomalies is detected, the car must be removed from service until repaired.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 50.
51. The supervisor must remove from service, until it is repaired, a car that shows one of the following defects:
(1)  a wheel rim, flange, plate or hub has a crack or is broken;
(2)  an axle has a crack or is bent or broken;
(3)  a roller bearing has damaged external parts that are cracked, broken or bent;
(4)  a roller bearing adapter is missing, cracked or broken; or
(5)  a truck bolster or side frame is broken.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 51.
52. The supervisor must remove from service, until it is repaired, a car that shows one of the following defects:
(1)  the centre sill is broken or, in the case of a tank car, the stub sill has a crack in the parent metal;
(2)  a cross bearer or a body bolster is broken;
(3)  the centre plate is broken;
(4)  at least 2 door stops are missing or broken;
(5)  safety hangers on sliding or plug doors are missing or damaged; or
(6)  sliding or plug doors are off the rails.
Also, a flat car with lading restraining devices worn or damaged to the extent that these devices will not restrain the load must be removed from service. Likewise, a car that has an object on its floor that is not properly secured and could fall off must be removed from service.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 52.
53. The supervisor must remove from service, until it is repaired, a car that shows one of the following defects:
(1)  a coupler shank is bent out of alignment to the extent that the coupler will not couple automatically;
(2)  a coupler yoke is broken;
(3)  a draft key or a draft key retainer is inoperative or missing;
(4)  a vertical coupler pin retainer plate or a follower plate is missing or broken;
(5)  a coupler knuckle is broken or cracked on the inside pulling face of the knuckle; or
(6)  a coupler pin retainer is missing or broken.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 53.
54. Car ladders must be equipped with steps or rungs placed at a height of not more than 60 cm (24 in.) above the rails and set back at 10 cm (4 in.) or less from the side.
The ladders must be equipped with an additional step where the step or rung is placed at a height of more than 50 cm (20 in.) above the rails.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 54.
DIVISION IX
TRACK MAINTENANCE STANDARDS
55. Before starting any maintenance work on a track, the foreman who is in charge of the work must inform the rail operating supervisor thereof.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 55.
56. Before starting any maintenance work on a track, the foreman who is in charge of the work must protect the track as follows:
(1)  each switch must be locked with a padlock, to which he is the only one to have the key, in the position that prevents access to the track in question; or
(2)  place a stop signal between the rails at the ends of the working limits; the signal consists of a red flag and a monitoring system.
The signal referred to in subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph must be set up on staffs at a height that ensures a clear view thereof from the equipment. It may not be removed without the foreman’s authorization.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 56.
57. Placing equipment that would block a clear view of the signal referred to in section 56 is prohibited, unless the locomotive remains on the track until the signal is moved to include such equipment in the new limits being protected.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 57.
58. A locomotive engineer may not pass the stop signal referred to in subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph of section 56.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 58.
59. Each semester and before allowing the movement of trains after fire, flood, earthquake, storm or other occurrence that might have damaged the track structure, the rail transport system operator must have a visual inspection of the tracks in service undertaken by a person who has the knowledge, training and experience necessary to detect the defects in the track referred to in sections 60 to 82.
Inspections must be made on foot or on equipment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, turnouts and railway crossings must be inspected on foot.
The identification of the track inspected, the location and nature of any anomalies, the corrective measures taken, the date of inspection and the name of the person who carried out the inspection must all be recorded in an inspection register and kept on the site by the operator for at least 2 years from the date of inspection.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 59.
60. Each drainage must be maintained to accommodate expected water flow alongside the track.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 60.
61. Rail gauge must be more than 142.24 cm (4 ft. 8 in.) and not less than 147.32 cm (4 ft. 10 in.).
Rail gauge is measured between the heads of the rails at right-angles to the rails in a plane 1.59 cm (5/8 in.) below the top of the rail head.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 61.
62. Alignment, in relation to uniformity, measured from an 18.9 m (62 ft.) chord may not exceed 12.7 cm (5 in.).
When the track is tangent, the ends of the chord must be placed at points on the gauge side of the rail, 1.59 cm (5/8 in.) below the top of the rail head. Either rail may be used, however, the same rail must be used for the full length of that segment.
When the track is curved, the ends of the chord must be placed at points on the gauge side of the outer rail, 1.59 cm (5/8 in.) below the top of the rail head.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 62.
63. The outside rail of a curve may not be lower than the inside rail or have more than 15.24 cm (6 in.) of elevation.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 63.
64. Track surface must comply with the following requirements:
(1)  the runoff in any 9.45 m (31 ft.) of rail at the end of a raise may not be more than 8.89 cm (31/2 in.);
(2)  the deviation from uniform profile on any rail at the mid-ordinate of an 18.9 m (62 ft.) chord may not be more than 7.62 cm (3 in.);
(3)  deviation from designated elevation on spirals may not be more than 4.44 cm (13/4 in.);
(4)  variation in cross level on spirals in any 9.45 m (31 ft.) may not be more than 5.08 cm (2 in.);
(5)  deviation from zero cross level at any point on tangent or from designated elevation on curves between spirals may not be more than 7.62 cm (3 in.); and
(6)  the difference in cross level between any 2 points less than 18.9 m (62 ft.) apart on tangents and curves between spirals may not be more than 7.62 cm (3 in.).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 64.
65. The track must be supported by base material that will provide drainage for the track.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 65.
66. Any 11.88 m (39 ft.) segment shall have 5 evenly spread crossties; they shall not be:
(1)  broken through;
(2)  split or otherwise impaired to the extent the crossties will allow the ballast to work through, or will not hold spikes or rail fasteners;
(3)  so deteriorated that the tie plate or base of rail can move laterally more than 1.27 cm (1/2 in.) related to the crosstie;
(4)  cut by the tie plate through more than 40% of a tie’s thickness; and
(5)  damaged by derailment, components lying about or fire so that the ties cannot ensure maintenance of the track surface, gauge or alignment.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 66.
67. For the purposes of sections 61 to 64 and paragraph 3 of section 66, the amount of rail movement that occurs while the track is loaded must be added to the measurements of the unloaded track.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 67.
68. Tracks shall have at least one crosstie, having no one of the defects referred to in section 67, whose centreline is within 60 cm (24 in.) of the rail joint location.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 68.
69. The rail operating supervisor must stop equipment movement as long as one of the following defects still remains on the rail:
(1)  compound transverse fissure or engine burn fracture that affects rail head cross-sectional area at 100%;
(2)  vertical split head;
(3)  head web separation;
(4)  bolt hole crack extending to the rail head
(5)  broken base more than 15.24 cm (6 in.); or
(6)  ordinary break.
Notwithstanding the first paragraph, equipment movement is authorized provided that a person designated by the operator is in charge of it.
Applying joint bars may be a remedial action to the defects referred to in subparagraphs 1, 5 and 6 of the first paragraph.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 69.
70. Any mismatch of rails at joints may not be more than 0.63 cm (1/4 in.).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 70.
71. Each rail joint must be of the proper design and dimensions for the rail on which it applies.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 71.
72. Each joint bar must be held in position by at least one track bolt on each rail tightened to allow the joint bar to firmly support the rails and to allow longitudinal movement of the rail in the joint.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 72.
73. Any joint bar that is cracked or broken between the middle 2 bolt holes must be replaced.
The operator may not use a rail or joint bar having a hole made by a thermal process.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 73.
74. A sufficient number of rail anchoring devices shall be applied to provide adequate longitudinal restraint.
Anchoring devices must be evenly spaced on the length of the rail and on the same side of the crosstie on both rails.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 74.
75. Rails must be kept in place by a sufficient number of fastenings to ensure gauge.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 75.
76. In turnouts and crossings of 2 railway lines,
(1)  the fastenings must be maintained so as to keep the components securely in place;
(2)  track alignment, surface and gauge must be maintained;
(3)  each switch, frog and guard rail must be kept free of obstructions that may interfere with the passage of equipment wheels; and
(4)  each flangeway must be clean and at least 3.81 cm (11/2 in.) and not more than 5.08 cm (2 in.) and at least 3.81 cm (11/2 in.) deep.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 76.
77. Each stock rail must be securely seated in switch plates, but care must be used to avoid canting the rail by overtightening the rail braces.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 77.
78. Each switch point must fit its stock rail properly, with the switch stand in either of its closed positions.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 78.
79. The flangeway depth measured from the wheel-bearing area of a frog must be at least 3.49 cm (13/8 in.).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 79.
80. The outer edge of a wheel tread may not contact the gauge side of a spring wing rail.
The toe of each wing rail must be tightly bolted. Each spring must have a tension sufficient to hold the wing rail against the point rail.
The clearance between the hold-down housing and the horn may not be more than 0.63 cm (1/4 in.).
Each frog with a bolt hole defect or head-web separation must be replaced.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 80.
81. The raised guard on a self-guarded frog may not be worn more than 0.95 cm (3/8 in).
If repairs are made to a self-guarded frog without removing it from service, the guarding face must be restored before rebuilding the point.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 81.
82. The distance between the point and the active face of the guard rail may not be less than 137.48 cm (4 ft. 61/8 in).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 82.
CHAPTER II
RAIL SAFETY AT LEVEL CROSSINGS
DIVISION I
OBJECT
83. This Chapter governs rail traffic at level crossings within the meaning of paragraph 2 of section 1 of the Act to ensure safety in guided land transport (chapter S-3.3) and in the cases provided for in the second paragraph of section 18 of that Act.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 83.
DIVISION II
SIGNS
84. Level crossing signs must comply with those described in Schedule III and indicate the number of tracks where the road crosses 2 tracks or more. The mileage point of the level crossing must be indicated on the back of one of the signs.
Those signs must be covered, over their surface, with a silver white colour that complies with Standard 62-GP-11M, Reflectivity Level 1 or better. Their reflectivity must never be less than 50% of its initial value. The border must be drawn with transparent red ink by serigraphy. The number and illustration of tracks must be in black or drawn with transparent red ink by serigraphy.
In addition, those signs must be erected in accordance with Schedule IV. Where the distance, measured along the public road between the centre lines of 2 adjacent tracks, is more than 30 m (100 ft.), each level crossing is considered as distinct.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 84.
DIVISION III
MOVEMENT RULES
85. The locomotive engineer shall appoint a member of his crew to provide protection of a level crossing before passing over it when
(1)  the level crossing is not protected by a watchman, a signalman or gates and the locomotive engineer cannot plainly see it;
(2)  the level crossing automatic warning device is defective; or
(3)  the level crossing is equipped with an automatic warning device and the equipment must make a reverse movement after it has passed over the level crossing without activating the automatic warning device again.
The engineer may not enter the level crossing with the leading car before he has received the signal to pass over it from the appointed person.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 85.
86. The person appointed by the engineer must be at a place from where he may observe the level crossing and give signals and instructions to the engineer as necessary.
With hand signals, he must stop vehicular and pedestrian traffic to allow the equipment to pass over the level crossing. He must stay at that place until the level crossing is fully occupied with the equipment.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 86.
87. When switching near a level crossing, an engineer may not allow any equipment to stand on whole or part of the level crossing for a period longer than 5 minutes when vehicular or pedestrian traffic requires passage.
When emergency vehicles with flashing lights or revolving beacons in operation require passage, he must take all measures to clear the level crossing.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 87.
88. A locomotive engineer may not leave equipment standing within 30 m (100 ft.) of a level crossing.
The first paragraph does not apply when equipment is left standing for purposes of loading or unloading or when a gate prevents the equipment’s access to the level crossing.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 88.
89. A locomotive engineer may not place equipment at a place where it causes the unnecessary operation of an automatic warning device.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 89.
90. The boxes containing the automatic warning device manual control must be closed and locked when they are not in use.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 90.
CHAPTER III
TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES
O.C. 1401-2000, c. III; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION I
INTERPRETATION
O.C. 1401-2000, div. I; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
91. In this Regulation,
“Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations” means
the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (SOR/2001-286).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 91; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
92. The words and expressions appearing in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations have the meaning assigned by those Regulations or the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act (S.C. 1992, c. 34) except in the following cases where:
“consignor” means a person who offers dangerous substances for transport;
“handling” means, regardless of the facilities where it takes place, loading, unloading, containerizing or packing of dangerous substances transported or to be transported by railway; and
“inspector” means any person authorized by the Minister of Transport to act as an inspector for the purposes of this Regulation.
Where the provisions of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations are inconsistent with the provisions of this Regulation, the latter prevails.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 92; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION II
CLASSIFICATION
O.C. 1401-2000, div. II; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
93. Any dangerous good within the meaning of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act (S.C. 1992, c. 34) is designated as a dangerous substance.
A dangerous substance belongs to the class attributed to it according to Schedule 1 to or Part 2 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 93; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
94. A consignor shall classify a dangerous substance in accordance with paragraphs 1 to 5 of section 2.2 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations before offering it for transport.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 94; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION III
DOCUMENTATION
O.C. 1401-2000, div. III; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
95. The requirements related to the shipping documents prescribed by sections 3.1 to 3.4, 3.8, 3.10 and 3.11 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations apply to the transportation and handling of dangerous substances.
The shipping document must contain the minimum information prescribed in sections 3.5 and 3.6 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 95; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION IV
SAFETY MARKS
O.C. 1401-2000, div. IV; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
96. The safety marks prescribed in Part 4 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations must be displayed in accordance with the provisions of those Regulations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 96; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION V
SAFETY STANDARDS AND RULES
O.C. 1401-2000, div. V; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
97. The safety standards and rules to which section 1.3 and Schedules 1, 2 and 3 to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations refer apply, with the necessary modifications, to the transportation and handling of dangerous substances.
The same applies to sections 1.5 to 1.13, 1.15 to 1.20, 1.25 to 1.27, 1.29, 1.31 to 1.34, 1.36 to 1.43 and 1.45 to 1.47 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 97; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
98. No person shall handle, offer for transport or transport dangerous substances in means of containment unless the provisions of Part 5 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations are complied with.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 98; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
99. Sections 6.1 to 6.8 of Part 6 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations apply to the transportation and handling of dangerous substances.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 99; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
100. Section 7.1 respecting the requirement for an emergency response assistance plan under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations applies to the transportation and handling of dangerous substances.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 100; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
101. Any person who has possession of dangerous substances at the time of an accidental release of such substances shall report the accidental release immediately in accordance with section 8.1 of Part 8 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 101; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
102. The provisions of Part 10 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations also apply to the transportation and handling of dangerous substances.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 102; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
DIVISION VI
(Replaced)
O.C. 1401-2000, div. VI; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
103. (Replaced).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 103; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
104. (Replaced).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 104; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
105. (Replaced).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 105; O.C. 909-2003, s. 2.
CHAPTER IV
ANNOUNCEMENT OF WORKS AND REPORTS
106. The works that must be announced in accordance with section 5 of the Act to ensure safety in guided land transport (chapter S-3.3) are the following:
(1)  the construction of or alteration to a track requiring the acquisition of land added to the location of a track;
(2)  the construction of or alteration to a railway line that may have an influence on the drainage of land adjoining the location of a track.
The announcement must be made through a notice published in a daily newspaper and in a weekly newspaper delivered in the territory where the works will be carried out.
The period during which one may oppose the works shall be of not less than 60 days.
This section does not apply to work required to carry out a shared transportation infrastructure project that is the subject of an agreement entered into under section 88.10 of the Transport Act (chapter T-12).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 106; S.Q. 2017, c. 17, s. 76.
107. The traffic report referred to in section 49 of the Act must be written according to the tenor provided for in Schedule V.
The report must be transmitted every year, before 1 March, and it must contain the data, according to either of the units of measure provided for in that Schedule, for the preceding year’s operations.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 107.
108. The accident report referred to in section 44 of the Act must be written according to the tenor provided for in Schedule VI.
The operator is exempted from notifying the Minister and from producing an accident report in any of the following cases:
(1)  no equipment was involved in the accident; or
(2)  the accident happened in a workshop.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 108.
CHAPTER V
PENAL
109. Any contravention of the provisions of the first paragraph of section 3, sections 6, 8, 10 to 13, the first and second paragraphs of section 14, the second paragraph of section 15, sections 16, 18, 21 to 23, the first and third paragraphs of section 24, the second paragraph of section 25, the second paragraph of section 26, section 27, the first paragraph of section 28, sections 29 to 31, the second paragraph of section 32, sections 34, 35, 37, the first paragraph of section 38, sections 39 to 46, the second paragraph of section 47, sections 49 to 53, 55 to 59, section 69, the second paragraph of section 73, sections 85 to 87, the first paragraph of section 88, section 89 and sections 94 to 102 constitutes a violation.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 109; O.C. 909-2003, s. 3.
110. Any contravention of one of the safety rules provisions approved or imposed by the Minister under Division III of Chapter IV of the Act to ensure safety in guided land transport (chapter S-3.3) and concerning one of the subjects referred to in the Rail safety code constitutes a violation.
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 110.
111. (Omitted).
O.C. 1401-2000, s. 111.
HAND SIGNALS
O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. I.
WHISTLE OR HORN SIGNALS
Sound Indication

(1) o Stop signal. Braking system is equalized; angle cock
may be closed and the cars may be uncoupled.

(2) oo (a) Answer to a “stop” signal (except a fixed signal).
(b) Answer to any signal not otherwise provided for.
NOTE: b is not applicable when switching.

(3) oooo Call for signals;

(4) Succession of Alarm for persons or animals on or near the track.
short sounds

(5) _ _ o _ (a) At every whistle sign.
(b) At least 20 seconds of every level crossing, to be
prolonged or repeated until the level crossing is
fully occupied by the engine or cars pushed.
(c) At frequent intervals when view is restricted by
weather, curvature or other conditions.

Signals are illustrated by “o” for short sounds; “_” for longer sounds.
O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. II.
CONFORMITY OF LEVEL CROSSING SIGNS
O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. III.
ERECTION OF LEVEL CROSSING SIGNS
O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. IV.
SCHEDULE V
(s. 107)
TRAFFIC REPORT
OPERATOR’S NAME:___________________________________________________________________

YEAR:_______________________________________


DESCRIPTION METRIC UNITS IMP. UNITS


TRACKS


1 Length of operated km miles
network


2 Length of main tracks km miles


EQUIPMENT IN SERVICE


3 Locomotives in service units units


4 Cars units units


SHIPPING


5 Shipped tons tons tons


Main goods shipped
by category


a) tons tons


b) tons tons


c) tons tons


d) tons tons


RECEIPT


6 Tons received tons tons


Main goods received
by category


a) tons tons


b) tons tons


c) tons tons


d) tons tons


OPERATION PARAMETERS


7 Tons carried tons tons


8 Total gross ton-km
or gross ton-miles ton-km ton-miles


9 Total train-km or
train-miles train-km train-miles


10 Gross tonnage
per train tons tons


11 Loaded cars units units


12 Unloaded cars units units


13 Passengers carried number number


14 Passenger-km or
passenger-miles passenger- passenger-
km miles


15 Railway employees persons- persons-
years years


16 Fuel consumed by
motive power units litres gallons

O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. V.
SCHEDULE VI
(s. 108)
ACCIDENT REPORT
Operator: __________________________________________________________________________________
No. of train or other equipment: ___________________________ Direction: ____________________________
Place of the accident: __________________ Mileage point __________________Station: __________________
Date: ______________________ Time: ____________________ Locomotive No.: _______________________
Train gross tonnage: ________________ Number of cars: ________________ Loaded cars: _______________
Conductor: ____________________________________ Engineer: ___________________________________
Description of the accident: ___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Number of victims: Killed: ______________________________ Injured: _____________________________
Status of the victims (passenger, employee, other): _______________________________________________
Apparent causes of the accident: ______________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Investigation to come: Yes: ________________________________ No: _______________________________
Other observations: _________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Signature (name, address and position or title of the writer of the report): ______________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
O.C. 1401-2000, Sch. VI.
REFERENCES
O.C. 1401-2000, 2000 G.O. 2, 5585
O.C. 909-2003, 2003 G.O. 2, 2788
S.Q. 2017, c. 17, s. 76
764-2019, 2019 G.O. 2, 1647O.C. 764-2019, 2019 G.O. 2, 1647