C-26, r. 113.01 - Code of ethics of occupational therapists

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chapter C-26, r. 113.01
Code of ethics of occupational therapists
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS — CODE OF ETHICS
Professional Code
(chapter C-26, s. 87).
C-26
May 14 2015
DIVISION I
PURPOSE, APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION
1. This Code sets forth the duties of members of the Ordre des ergothérapeutes du Québec towards the public, the clients, the profession and the Order, pursuant to section 87 of the Professional Code (chapter C-26).
It also sets out the values and ethical principles that form the foundation of the profession of occupational therapist.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 1.
2. This Code applies to all occupational therapists, regardless of how they practice their professional activities or the circumstances in which they practice them.
The duties and obligations set forth in this Code, the Professional Code (chapter C-26) and all regulations governing its application remain the same even if occupational therapists practice their professional activities within a company or partnership.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 2.
3. In this Code, client means the person or organization to whom the occupational therapist provides professional services.
Depending on the context, occupational therapists may have more than one client with regard to the same performance of services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 3.
DIVISION II
VALUES AND ETHICAL PRINCIPLES
4. The foundation of the profession of occupational therapist is based on the following values and ethical principles, in particular:
(1)  respect for the person and for that person’s values and right to decide for themselves;
(2)  protection and enhancement of the person’s health and quality of life, especially by enabling occupation;
(3)  occupational participation and justice, both as an individual and as part of a group;
(4)  integrity, independence, objectivity, skill and rigour;
(5)  honesty, accountability and transparency;
(6)  respect for the confidentiality of personal information;
(7)  respect for the honour and dignity of the profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 4.
DIVISION III
RULES OF ETHICS
§ 1.  — General provisions
5. Occupational therapists must endeavour to improve the quality of occupational therapy services and support measures likely to promote their accessibility.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 5.
6. Occupational therapists must contribute to the development of their profession according to their resources and skill set, in particular through research and the exchange of knowledge with other members, students and interns.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 6.
7. Occupational therapists who undertake any research project on human beings, or who are called to collaborate on such a project must ensure that the project complies with the generally recognized scientific principles and standards regarding research ethics.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 7.
8. Occupational therapists must take into account all the foreseeable consequences that may result from their treatments, work and research on the life, health, quality of life and safety of individuals as well as on their property.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 8.
9. Occupational therapists must promote measures designed to provide education and information on occupational therapy, in particular with regard to promoting health and preventing suicide, illness, accidents and social issues among individuals, families and groups.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 9.
10. Occupational therapists must ensure that the framework in which they practice their profession allows them to comply with their obligations under this Code, the Professional Code (chapter C-26) and all regulations governing its application.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 10.
11. Occupational therapists must use their professional title when practicing their profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 11.
12. Occupational therapists who practice another trade or profession must clearly indicate to their clients under which title they are providing their services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 12.
13. Wherever occupational therapists practice their profession, they must provide, upon request, proof that they are members of the Ordre des ergothérapeutes du Québec.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 13.
14. Occupational therapists must, in the practice of their profession, assume their personal civil liability. They may not elude or attempt to elude liability, nor request that a client or a person renounce any recourse in the case of professional negligence on their part. Furthermore, they may not invoke the liability of the company or partnership within which they carry out their professional activities, or that of another person who also carries out their activities there as a ground to exclude or limit their personal civil liability.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 14.
§ 2.  — Competence, integrity and professionalism
15. Occupational therapists have a duty to be competent. They must practice their profession according to generally recognized standards and best practices.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 15.
16. Occupational therapists must respect the generally recognized scientific and professional principles when using measurement instruments and material related to the practice of occupational therapy.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 16.
17. Occupational therapists must avoid making or allowing any false representation to be made with respect to their level of competence or the effectiveness of their own services, those of a colleague, or those generally provided by members of the profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 17.
18. Occupational therapists must refrain from practicing in conditions or situations that could compromise the quality of their services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 18.
19. Occupational therapists must display reasonable availability and diligence in the practice of their profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 19.
20. Occupational therapists must endeavour to establish and maintain relationships based on mutual trust and refrain from practicing their profession in an impersonal manner.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 20.
21. Occupational therapists must respect their clients’ personal values and beliefs.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 21.
22. Opinions expressed by occupational therapists must be congruent, complete, founded and accurate, and if necessary, their limited scope must be noted.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 22.
23. Occupational therapists must carry out their professional duties with integrity and objectivity. They must act with respect and dignity.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 23.
24. Occupational therapists must refrain from obtaining for a client or helping them to obtain any unjustified or illicit benefits, in particular by falsifying a declaration, report or any document concerning a client.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 24.
25. Occupational therapists must refrain from providing professional services to persons with whom they have a relationship that could adversely affect the quality of the treatment.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 25.
26. Occupational therapists must refrain from interfering in the personal affairs of their clients in matters not related to the practice of the profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 26.
27. For the duration of the professional relationship, occupational therapists must refrain from establishing personal friendships that may compromise the quality of professional services, or enter into amorous or sexual relationships with their clients.
The duration of the professional relationship is determined taking into account the nature of the problems and the duration of professional services provided, the client’s vulnerability and the likelihood of having to provide professional services to the client again.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 27.
28. Occupational therapists must not pressure or repeatedly induce a person to make use of their professional services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 28.
29. Occupational therapists must not:
(1)  perform or multiply professional acts without sufficient reason;
(2)  perform an act that is disproportionate or inappropriate with respect to their clients’ needs;
(3)  sell or rent any material or equipment to their clients that is not justified by their condition.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 29.
§ 3.  — Consent and information regarding the provision of services
30. Before agreeing on the provision of professional services with a client, occupational therapists must make sure to have a common understanding with the client about the request for services.
Occupational therapists must refuse all requests for occupational therapy services:
(1)  that do not fall within the parameters of their area of practice;
(2)  for which they do not have the required competencies or means.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 30.
31. Before providing professional services, occupational therapists must obtain the free and informed consent of their clients or their legal representatives, unless in an emergency.
To do so, occupational therapists must inform their clients of the following:
(1)  the aim, nature and relevance of the primary treatment methods and professional services that will be provided;
(2)  the advantages, inconveniences, risks and limitations of these professional services, as well as their alternatives;
(3)  the option to refuse in whole or in part, the professional services offered, or to cease to receive the services at any time, and, if applicable, the consequences of such a refusal.
If circumstances warrant, occupational therapists must also communicate to clients other relevant information, in particular:
(1)  the fact that services may be provided, in whole or in part, by another person;
(2)  the appropriate caution regarding evaluation methods, measurement instruments or treatment methods that have not been sufficiently tested;
(3)  the mutual responsibilities of the parties, including, if applicable, agreement on the amount of fees and other expenses, as well as the terms and conditions of payment;
(4)  confidentiality rules and their limitations, as well as the conditions associated with forwarding confidential information about the treatment.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 31.
32. Occupational therapists must ensure that the client’s consent is free and informed by making sure that the client has properly understood the information communicated.
Furthermore, they must ensure that the client’s consent remains free and informed throughout the professional relationship.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 32.
33. Occupational therapists must provide their clients with the explanations necessary for the understanding and appreciation of services provided.
They must also provide clients with the information they require about the provision of these services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 33.
34. Occupational therapists must inform their clients as soon as possible of any incident, accident or complication related to their services and must promptly take the means necessary to remedy, minimize or offset their consequences.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 34.
§ 4.  — Consultations
35. Occupational therapists must at all times recognize the client’s right to consult another occupational therapist, professional or competent individual.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 35.
36. When the interest of the client so requires, occupational therapists must, with the client’s permission, consult a colleague, professional or another competent individual, or refer the client to one of these persons.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 36.
§ 5.  — Ceasing to provide services
37. Occupational therapists may not cease to provide professional services to a client before completing the agreed upon treatment unless they have sound and reasonable grounds. Sound and reasonable grounds include, in particular:
(1)  loss of the relationship of trust between the client and occupational therapist;
(2)  lack of benefit to the client from the professional services offered by the occupational therapist;
(3)  the likelihood that maintaining the professional services may, in the occupational therapist’s judgment, become more harmful than beneficial for the client;
(4)  the impossibility for the occupational therapist to establish or maintain a professional relationship with the client, particularly in the presence of a conflict of interest or a context that could call into question the former’s professional independence;
(5)  inducement by the client to perform illegal or fraudulent acts;
(6)  non-compliance by the client with the conditions agreed on and the impossibility of entering into a reasonable agreement with the client to reinstate the conditions, in particular with regards to professional fees;
(7)  the decision by the occupational therapist to scale down or to put an end to his or her practice.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 37.
38. Occupational therapists who plan to cease providing professional services to a client must give the client reasonable notice and take the measures to ensure that this termination causes as little prejudice to the client as possible.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 38.
§ 6.  — Conflicts of interest and professional independence
39. Occupational therapists must maintain their professional independence at all times. They must ignore any intervention or situation that could affect or influence the performance of their professional duties to the detriment of their client.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 39.
40. Occupational therapists must avoid any situation where they would be in a conflict of interest.
Without restricting the generality of the preceding, occupational therapists are in a conflict of interest in particular when:
(1)  the interests concerned are such that they may be influenced to favour certain interests other than those of their clients or when their judgment, objectivity, professional independence, integrity or loyalty towards their clients may be compromised;
(2)  the circumstances offer them an undue advantage, either direct or indirect, real or potential.
When occupational therapists practice professional activities within a company or partnership, situations of conflict of interest are assessed with regard to all clients within the company or partnership.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 40.
41. Occupational therapists must subordinate to the interests of the client their personal interests, the interests of the company or partnership within which they engage in their professional activities or in which they have an interest, and the interests of any other person engaging in their professional activities within such company or partnership.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 41.
42. Occupational therapists must ensure that their obligations towards the company or partnership in their role as administrator or director are not incompatible with those they have towards their clients.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 42.
43. As soon as they become aware that they are in a conflict of interest, occupational therapists must take reasonable measures to remedy the situation, notify their client and ask the client for permission to continue providing them with professional services.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 43.
44. Where occupational therapists practice their profession with several clients who may have divergent interests between them, they must inform them of their duty to be objective and of the specific actions they will take to provide professional services. If the situation becomes irreconcilable with the impartial nature of their relationship with each client, they must end the professional relationship.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 44.
45. Occupational therapists with interests in an enterprise that provides therapeutic material or equipment that they recommend to their client must respect the latter’s free choice by indicating other locations where such items can be found.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 45.
46. Except for the remuneration to which they are entitled, occupational therapists may not receive, pay or agree to pay any benefit, rebate or commission in connection to the practice of their profession except for the usual tokens of gratitude and modest gifts.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 46.
47. Constituting a benefit as referred to in section 46 is, in particular, the enjoyment of a building or space to practice the profession at no cost or at a discounted rate, by an occupational therapist or a partnership within which he or she carries on professional activities, by another person or partnership in a context that may present a conflict of interest, whether real or apparent.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 47.
§ 7.  — Confidential information
48. Occupational therapists must respect the secrecy of all confidential information obtained in the practice of their profession.
Occupational therapists may only be released from professional secrecy with the authorization of their client, or when so ordered or authorized by a specific legislative provision.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 48.
49. When occupational therapists practice their profession with a couple, family or group, they must safeguard each participant’s right to professional secrecy.
Occupational therapists must also encourage participants to respect the confidentiality of shared information.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 49.
50. Occupational therapists must avoid indiscreet conversations about clients and the services provided to them.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 50.
51. Occupational therapists must take reasonable means to ensure the protection of confidential information by all persons collaborating with them or practicing their activities within the same company or partnership.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 51.
52. Occupational therapists must respect the confidentiality of the identity of the persons with whom they enter into a professional relationship, in particular by refraining from gathering information and exploring aspects of their private lives that have no relation with providing professional services to their clients.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 52.
53. Occupational therapists must keep the identity of persons confidential when using personal information, obtained in the practice of the profession or through research, for teaching or scientific purposes.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 53.
54. Occupational therapists who wish to use audio-visual techniques must:
(1)  inform their clients and all persons involved beforehand of the purpose of the recording and the use that will be made of the audio-visual document, including mention of the persons or categories of persons who may have access to it and how long it will be kept;
(2)  obtain the written permission of their client and all persons involved.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 54.
55. Occupational therapists may communicate information protected by professional secrecy to prevent an act of violence, including suicide, where they have reasonable cause to believe that there is an imminent danger of death or serious bodily injury to a person or an identifiable group of persons.
However, occupational therapists may only communicate the information to the person or persons exposed to the danger, their representative, or to the persons who can come to that person’s aid.
Occupational therapists may only communicate such information as is necessary to achieve the purposes for which the information is communicated.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 55.
56. Occupational therapists who communicate information that is protected by professional secrecy to prevent an act of violence must enter the following particulars in the client’s record:
(1)  the identity of the person or group of persons exposed to the danger, the identified danger and the act of violence that the information intended to prevent;
(2)  the reasons justifying their decision to communicate the information;
(3)  the identity of the person to whom the information was given, specifying, as the case may be, if it was given to the person or persons exposed to the danger, their representative or the persons who can come to that person’s aid;
(4)  the information communicated, the date and time of the communication and the mode of communication.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 56.
§ 8.  — Conditions and procedures of the exercise of the right to access and rectify records
Provision applicable to occupational therapists practicing in the public sector
57. Occupational therapists who practice their profession:
(1)  in a public body governed by the Act respecting Access to documents held by public bodies and the Protection of personal information (chapter A-2.1), or
(2)  in an institution as defined in the Act respecting health services and social services (chapter S-4.2) or the Act respecting health services and social services for Cree and Inuit Native persons (chapter S-5),
must respect the rules of access to and rectification of records set out in those acts and facilitate their application.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 57.
Provision applicable to occupational therapists practicing within an enterprise
58. Occupational therapists practicing their profession within an enterprise governed by the Act respecting the protection of personal information in the private sector (chapter P-39.1) must respect the rules of access to and rectification of records set out in that Act and facilitate their application.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 58.
Provisions applicable to occupational therapists not practicing in the public sector or within an enterprise
59. Occupational therapists must allow their clients or any other person authorized by the latter to consult or obtain a copy of documents concerning them in any record established in their regard.
Occupational therapists must respond promptly to such a request, at the latest within 30 days of its receipt. They may require that such a request be made in writing.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 59.
60. Occupational therapists may request reasonable fees not exceeding the cost for reproducing or transcribing documents and the cost of transmitting a copy of them.
Occupational therapists who intend to charge such fees must, before proceeding with reproducing, transcribing or transmitting the information, inform their clients of the approximate amount they will have to pay.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 60.
61. Occupational therapists must refuse to release to clients information concerning them if such disclosure would likely reveal personal information concerning a third person or the existence of such information, and the disclosure could seriously harm that third person, unless the latter consents to the communication of the information or in the case of an emergency that threatens the life, health or safety of the person concerned.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 61.
62. Occupational therapists must allow their clients:
(1)  to have any information that is inaccurate, incomplete, ambiguous, outdated or unjustified in any document concerning them corrected or deleted;
(2)  to make written comments in the record concerning them.
Occupational therapists must respond promptly to such a request, at the latest within 30 days of its receipt. They may require that this request be made in writing.
Occupational therapists must forward to their clients, free of charge, a duly dated copy of the document or part of the document filed in their clients’ records so that the clients may verify that the information has been corrected or deleted, or, as the case may be, give the clients an attestation stating that the clients’ written comments have been entered in the record.
Occupational therapists must forward, free of charge, a copy of the corrected information or an attestation that the information was deleted or, as the case may be, that the written comments were filed in their record, to all persons who received information in the 6 preceding months and, where applicable, to the person who provided that information.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 62.
63. Occupational therapists must allow their clients or any person authorized by the latter to take back a document entrusted to them by their clients.
Occupational therapists must respond promptly to such a request, at the latest within 30 days of its receipt. They may require that this request be made in writing.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 63.
§ 9.  — Relationships with colleagues and third parties
64. Occupational therapists must refrain from denigrating anyone, in particular other occupational therapists or members of another professional order, abusing their trust or voluntarily misleading them. They must also not betray their good faith, engage in disloyal practices or claim credit for work done by them.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 64.
65. Occupational therapists must collaborate with their colleagues and members of other professions and seek to maintain harmonious relationships with them.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 65.
66. Occupational therapists called to comment on the work of their colleagues or members of other professions must do so in an objective and reasonable manner.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 66.
67. Occupational therapists must take reasonable measures to ensure that any person collaborating with them in the practice of their profession or any company or partnership within which they practice their profession respects this Code, the Professional Code (chapter C-26) and all regulations governing its application.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 67.
68. Occupational therapists with any kind of authority over other occupational therapists must ensure that the manner in which the latter practice their professional activities allows them to comply with their professional obligations.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 68.
69. Occupational therapists must not take advantage of their position of authority or their function to unduly hinder or limit the professional independence of other occupational therapists.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 69.
70. No occupational therapist may induce or cause another person to perform an act which, if performed by the occupational therapist, would place the occupational therapist in contravention of a provision of this Code, the Professional Code (chapter C-26) or any regulation governing its application, or allow another person to do so.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 70.
71. Occupational therapists must ensure that any person who assists them or is under their supervision in the practice of the profession is qualified and has the competence required to perform the tasks assigned to them.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 71.
72. Occupational therapists must adequately supervise the persons to whom the performance of professional services for which they are responsible was assigned.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 72.
§ 10.  — Fees and other expenses
73. Occupational therapists must charge and accept fair and reasonable fees, justified by the circumstances and in proportion to the services provided. In determining their fees, they must, in particular, take into account the following factors:
(1)  their experience and unique competencies;
(2)  the time required to provide the professional services, their unusual nature and the level of difficulty.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 73.
74. Occupational therapists must notify their client of the approximate and expected cost of their professional fees and other expenses. Moreover, they must notify their client immediately of any cost modifications.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 74.
75. Occupational therapists must provide their clients with all the explanations required for the understanding of their statement of fees and the terms of payment.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 75.
76. Occupational therapists who carry on their professional activities within a company or partnership must make sure that professional fees and costs related to the professional services provided by them are always clearly indicated on all invoices or fee statements issued by the company or partnership to the client.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 76.
77. Occupational therapists may not require advance payment of fees.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 77.
78. Occupational therapists who claim administrative fees for missed appointments by the client must do so according to a predetermined agreement with the client to that effect. These fees may not exceed the amount of lost fees and expenses incurred.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 78.
79. Subject to legislation, occupational therapists who charge supplementary fees to those reimbursed by a third party must have concluded an agreement to that effect with their client in advance.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 79.
80. With regard to the collection of payment, occupational therapists must:
(1)  not collect interest on outstanding accounts unless they have agreed to this condition with their client in advance. The interest thus charged must be at a reasonable rate;
(2)  not sell or assign their accounts for professional fees, except to another occupational therapist or a company or partnership within which they are authorized to carry on professional activities pursuant to the Regulation respecting the practice of the profession of occupational therapist in a partnership or joint-stock company (chapter C-26, r. 116.02);
(3)  ensure, as far as possible, that the person appointed to collect fees proceeds with tact and moderation as well as a respect for the confidentiality and practices related to debt collection authorized by law. They may communicate only the necessary information for that purpose.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 80.
81. Occupational therapists must, when required, inform their clients of their right to apply to the account conciliation and arbitration procedure as it is set out in the Règlement sur la procédure de conciliation et d’arbitrage des comptes des ergothérapeutes (chapter C-26, r.  118).
O.C. 342-2015, s. 81.
§ 11.  — Advertising and public statements
82. Occupational therapists must display professionalism in all their advertising and public statements and avoid discrediting the profession.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 82.
83. Occupational therapists may not, by any means whatsoever, engage in or allow advertising or a public statement:
(1)  that is false, incomplete, deceitful or liable to mislead the public;
(2)  that denigrates or discredits another person or disparages a service or product provided by that person.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 83.
84. Occupational therapists may not use a client endorsement or testimonial in their advertising or public statements.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 84.
85. Occupational therapists must keep a complete copy of every advertisement for 12 months following the date it was last authorized to be published or broadcast. This copy must be given to the Order upon request.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 85.
86. Advertising of an occupational therapist’s professional fees or prices for goods must be done in a manner that can be understood by persons without special knowledge of occupational therapy.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 86.
87. Occupational therapists who advertise a price must:
(1)  specify the services and fees included in the price;
(2)  indicate whether fees or additional services might be required which are not included in the price;
(3)  indicate the duration of a special price or rebate, if applicable.
However, occupational therapists may agree with their clients on an amount lower than the one advertised.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 87.
88. Occupational therapists who promote a product must disclose their interest in the enterprise that manufactures or distributes the product, if applicable.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 88.
§ 12.  — Relationship with the Order
89. Occupational therapists must promptly answer, in a complete and truthful manner, all verbal and written requests from a staff member of the Order or a person performing the duties assigned to him or her by the Professional Code (chapter C-26) and its regulations.
Occupational therapists must also remain available for all meetings required by any one of those persons.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 89.
90. Occupational therapists must, in due time:
(1)  inform the secretary of the Order if they have reason to believe:
(a)  that a person does not meet the requirements to have a permit or to be entered on the Order’s member roll;
(b)  that an occupational therapist does not respect the conditions of his or her permit or the restrictions on his or her right to practice;
(c)  that a person who is not a member of the Order is using the title of “Occupational Therapist” or “ergothérapeute” or a title or abbreviation that may lead one to believe that he or she is a member, or the abbreviation “erg.”, or initials that may lead one to believe that he or she is a member, or the initials “O.T.” or “O.T.R.”;
(d)  that a person is illegally practicing a professional activity reserved for members of the Order;
(2)  inform the syndic of the Order if they have reason to believe:
(a)  that an occupational therapist practices the profession in a manner likely to harm the public or that violates the provisions of this Code, the Professional Code (chapter C-26) or the regulations governing its application;
(b)  that a company or partnership within which occupational therapists practice professional activities contravenes this Code, the Professional Code or one of the regulations governing its application.
The disclosure of such information must occur in accordance with the obligations of professional secrecy.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 90.
91. Occupational therapists who are informed of an inquiry into their professional conduct or competence or of a complaint lodged against them must refrain from communicating with the person who initiated the inquiry without the prior written permission of the syndic or an assistant syndic.
Furthermore, occupational therapists must not try to influence, intimidate, threaten, harass or take reprisals against a person because the person has reported or intends to report behaviour that is in contravention with the occupational therapist’s professional obligations, or because the person has collaborated or intends to collaborate in an inspection or inquiry in this regard.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 91.
92. Occupational therapists must comply with all decisions rendered by the Order with regard to them and respect any agreements made with the board of directors, the executive committee, the secretary of the Order, a syndic or the professional inspection committee, including any committee to which the board of directors has delegated its authority in compliance with the provisions of the Professional Code (chapter C-26).
O.C. 342-2015, s. 92.
93. Where occupational therapists or companies or partnerships within which they practice use the graphic symbol of the Order for advertising purposes or documentation, they must make sure that it is an accurate copy of the original and that it is not represented in a way that may lead one to believe that the advertising or documents come from the Order or are approved by the Order.
O.C. 342-2015, s. 93.
94. This Code replaces the Code of ethics of occupational therapists (chapter C-26, r. 113).
O.C. 342-2015, s. 94.
95. (Omitted).
O.C. 342-2015, s. 95.
REFERENCES
O.C. 342-2015, 2015 G.O. 2, 573